RHA Calls for Decarbonisation of Freight “Road Map”

The Road Haulage Association has released a strategy paper setting out the organisations' approach to decarbonising the freight and logistics sector

In it, the RHA is calling for a new national road map to be developed by the UK Government, which it says is essential in supporting the decisions of businesses, authorities and people to get the best decarbonisation outcomes, while ensuring the economy and jobs are supported.

The RHA’s approach is guided by a hierarchy against which actions can be considered as the UK moves to a net zero road freight sector. This is described as Eliminate – Minimise – Offset.

This means that where possible, carbon emissions should be eliminated from freight movements. But, where this is not practicable, instead carbon emissions should be minimised. Finally, any remaining carbon emissions should be offset.

Hear from Richard Burnett, Chief Executive of the Road Haulage Association at the Microlise Transport Conference 2020, taking place on the 20th May at The Ricoh Arena in Coventry. Visit the conference website to learn more and secure your free place...

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In its paper, the RHA highlights a number of areas which need to be addressed, including vehicle technologies and standards, alternative fuels, operational measures within the supply chain,  infrastructure standards and management, and driver behaviour.

RHA chief executive, Richard Burnett said: “How the change is managed politically and economically over the next 25 years will be challenging. Our strategy sets out an approach that will ensure that sensible, evidence-based and pragmatic policies are in place to support investment in the green technology needed.

“The time for talking about the environment is over. We need clear global action to tackle climate change, and I am determined that the UK logistics sector will do its bit.

“The Government must ensure supportive policies exist that give our members the confidence to plan for a green future. By contrast, policy “mis-steps” such as clean air zones which have undermined trust must be avoided.”